It’s that time of year again. My inbox is full of holiday greetings from every research vendor who has me on their mailing list. I know it’s the thought that

Share

Last month I presented at IIeX for the first time along with my friend and colleague Kerry Hecht Labsuirs of Recollective. She gives a great overview of our research on

Share

I’ve been teaching Questionnaire Design at the University of Michigan’s Summer Institute in Survey Research Techniques, and I’m finding it hugely fun for a few reasons: 1. My students are

Share

I love this scene from Annie Hall, where Annie and Alvin are telling their respective therapists how often they have sex. Alvin: Hardly ever. Maybe three times a week. Annie: Constantly. I’d say three

Share

A friend just pointed me to this article on a Washington Post survey of local issues in my hometown of Washington, D.C.  Seems there’s a little hullaballoo about the framing of the survey results—namely,

Share

Welcome to the 5th and final segment of the response process model: reporting.   Encode –> Comprehend –> Retrieve –> Map –> Report Imagine a respondent has gone through the first four steps: they know

Share

Welcome to part 4 of the response process model: mapping.   Encode –> Comprehend –> Retrieve –> Map –> Report A respondent could understand your question (and remember the answer), but not be able to place their response in

Share

This is the third post in my series of real life examples of the response process model in action.   Encode –>Comprehend –> Retrieve –> Map –> Report If respondents know what happened and understand what is being

Share

I’m trying to keep this blog as practical and non-academic as possible, but one thing I learned at school that I still apply in every questionnaire I write was the Response Process

Share

I’m always surprised (and frankly, a little alarmed) when clients don’t want to pre-test a questionnaire. This strikes me as a little bit like launching an ad campaign without testing the content.

Share

When I teach Survey Design Boot Camp, I like to remind students that open ended questions are like a box of chocolates: you never know what you’re going to get. I

Share

I meet a lot of people who tell me their company or organization can’t afford research. I almost always tell them,  “Actually, you can’t afford NOT to do research! What kind

Share

 When I ventured out to work on my own, I was really excited about working from home. I quickly learned, though, that working alone all the time is not for

Share

I recently did a week-long juice fast at a wellness center.  Upon arrival, I was handed a questionnaire asking about my eating habits and how often I suffered from each

Share

Survey design is a linguistically intense undertaking.  Every respondent should get the same meaning from your questions—and it should be the meaning you had in mind when you wrote the

Share